Computer hacking is becoming increasingly common these days. While black hat hackers may be involved in malicious activities like identity theft or the creation of Trojan Horses, some hackers just hack for fun. You have to be smart to protect yourself from hackers. Make sure your computer is properly protected. There are many programs that will do this for you, but you can do it yourself as well if you learn how. Do not download anything unless you absolutely trust the source and configure your computer so that its security settings are tight. Install a firewall to protect it as well. Taking a peek at the common terms that hackers use. Knowing these terms will help you understand how hacking works and how to protect yourself from it.

• Back door - A hole deliberately placed by designers into a security system. Hackers use back doors to get into a system.

• Bit bucket - The universal data dump. Lost, deleted, or destroyed data ends up here.

• Black hat - A criminal hacker who causes damage and breaks the law by hacking.

• Cracker – someone who breaks into a security system. Many hackers separate themselves from crackers because crackers are often tied to organized crime rings.

• Daisy-chaining – process where a hacker gains entry into a computer or network and then uses it to gain access to another.

• Deep magic - A special technique central to a program.

• Hacker - A person who is able to break into a computer’s system without permission.

• Hacking run - A hacking session that lasts in an excess of eight to ten hours.

• Foo – Term used as a sample name for programs and files when the developer can’t think of anything else.

• Gray hat - A hacker who sometimes hacks illegally and sometimes hacks \“legally\”.

• KISS Principle - Acronym for “Keep It Simple Stupid”, used to control development complexity by hackers.

• Kluge - A clever programming trick that works for the wrong reason.

• Lots of MIPS but no I/O – describes a system that has a lot of processing power, but a bottlenecked input/output.

• Munge - A rewrite of a routine, data structure, or whole program.

• Netiquette - The standards of politeness across the internet; not often observed by hackers.

• Phreaking - The science of cracking a phone network.

• Script kiddie - A “copycat hacker” who copies other hacker’s techniques without creating anything of their own.

• Security through obscurity – hacker term for a common way of dealing with security holes where they are ignored and not documented with the hope nobody finds them.

• Sneaker - An individual hired to break into places with the purpose of testing their security.

• Spaghetti code – code that has a complex and tangled control structure.

• Time bomb – program that is set to trigger once certain conditions are reached.

• Trojan horse – program that disguises itself as one thing but once inside a computer, it actually does something else. Most often, they are damaging (viruses), but not all are..

• White hat - A hacker who is considered “nice” i.e. when he hacks, he informs the owner he has done it.

• Vaporware – term used by hackers referring to products released in advance of their official release date.

• Wetware – phrase referring to humans on the other end of a computer system.

• Virus - A self-replicating program that inserts itself into computer systems and causes damage.

• Voodoo programming - The use by guess of an obscure system that someone doesn’t really understand; i.e., whether it works or doesn’t work, the user has no real idea why..

• Vulcan nerve pinch - A keyboard combination that forces a soft-boot.

• Wedged - A point where a system is stuck; different from a crash, where the system is nonfunctioning.

• Wizard – person who completely understands how a program or process works.

• BotNet: is a network of computer you have established using malware on many computers with your inflicted by you, controlled by you.

• R.A.T. = Remote admin tool: A way to control other computers from yours and execute many different functions

• Xss = Cross-site-Scripting and is a web hacking method where you inject HTML or JavaScript on the web-page. This attack can be done by submitting queries into text boxes or simply in the URL

• Key loggers : Malware which is Constantly recording the infected computers Keystrokes and then sends you logs via E-mail or FTP.

• VPN = Virtual private network: A private Network which will completely hide your IP.

• VPS = Virtual private Server: A virtual private server is one of many virtual machines running on a single computer.They are often used by Internet hosting services. Although a VPS runs in software on the same physical computer as other customers

• DOS: Denial of Service is an attempt to make a machine or network resource unavailable to its intended users usually down by one machine.

• DDOS: Distributed Denial of Service is the same thing as DOS but from multiple systems

• SQL: structured query language is a query language used for accessing and modifying information in a database.

• Cookie logger: cookie logger is used to log the targets cookies then sends it to you Via E-mail or ftp

• Malware: Malware, short for malicious (or malevolent) software, is software used or created by attackers to disrupt computer operation, gather sensitive information, or gain access to private computer systems. It can appear in the form of code, scripts, active content, and other software. Malware is a general term used to refer to a variety of forms of hostile or intrusive software.

• vira – ‘vira’ cannot spread without the help of us humans. They are like parasites because they need a host to attach themselves to. The host is usually a legitimate looking program or file. Once this program is launched, the virus is executed and infects other files on your computer. vira can be very destructive. They can do damage to your computer hardware, software and files. vira are spread through the sharing of files and are many times sent within emails via attachments.

• Worms - A worm is a malicious program that can replicate itself onto other computers on a network. Unlike a virus, worms don’t need a human to be able to spread and infect systems. Once it infects a system, it uses that system to send out other copies of itself to other random systems attempting to infect them.

• Trojan Horse - A trojan horse is a malicious program that can be used to do silly things to a system like changing its desktop, mess with the user interface, and take control of your mouse. It can also be used for some serious things like accessing your data, erasing your files, stealing your passwords, and capturing your keystrokes.

• Logic Bombs – Logic bombs are usually pieces of code that are programmed into a program that lie dormant until a certain time or until a user does a certain action which causes it to be executed. When it is triggered it performs a certain function that the program wasn’t intended to do.

• Bacteria – Bacteria make many copies of themselves and eventually end up taking up all of the computers resources such as all of its processor power, memory and disk space. This results in the legitimate user losing access to those resources.

• Backdoors: Backdoors are much the same as Trojans or worms, except that they do something different: they open a “backdoor” onto a computer, providing a network connection for hackers or other malware to enter or for viruses or sp@m to be sent out through.

• Rootkit The malware most likely to have a human touch, rootkits are installed by crackers (bad hackers) on other peoples computers. he rootkit is designed to camouflage itself in a systems core processes so as to go undetected. It is the hardest of all malware to detect and therefore to remove; many experts recommend completely wiping your hard drive and re installing everything fresh.

• Adware are the programs which delivers ads to your computer (generally in POP-UPs form). They consume your network bandwidth and slow it down.

• Wabbits According to Wikipedia, wabbits are in fact rare, and its not hard to see why: they dont do anything to spread to other machines. A wabbit, like a virus, replicates itself, but it does not have any instructions to email itself or pass itself through a computer network in order to infect other machines. The least ambitious of all malware, it is content simply to focus on utterly devastating a single machine.

• Blended Threats – Blended threats combine all of the characteristics of the above and use them along with system vulnerabilities to spread and infect machines.



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